1. Hurricane Ike
2. Tornadoes
3. Hurricane Gustav
4. Midwest Flooding (Part One, Spring)
5. Midwest Flooding (Part Two, Summer)
6. Southeast Drought
7. California Wildfires
8. Western Snow
9. Colorado Heat Wave
10. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum

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Ike, a Category 4 hurricane, was the biggest storm of this year's Atlantic hurricane season. It made U.S. landfall on Sept. 13 at Galveston, Texas with winds above 100 mph.
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An est. 125 people died in nearly 1,500 tornadoes across the U.S., making it one of the top 10 deadliest seasons since reliable record-keeping began in 1953.
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Gustav was blamed for 25 U.S. deaths and its ferocious winds brought down trees and power lines, leaving thousands of residents without power.
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In late March, flooding was blamed for at least 17 deaths in Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Illinois.
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During the month of June, more than 1,100 daily precipitation records were broken throughout the Midwest.
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Rainfall deficits between Sept 2007 and Aug 2008 were still 10 to 20 inches over parts of the Southeast even after the 5 to 9 inches of rainfall from Tropical Storm Fay.
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California endured its driest spring in 114 years of record keeping, according to the National Climatic Data Center.
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In Montana, the city of Red Lodge recorded its highest snowfall total during a 24-hour period when 42 inches of snow fell.
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In August, Denver experienced 24 consecutive days of temperatures of 90 degrees and higher.
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On Sept. 14, Arctic sea ice was measured at its second-lowest extent on record.
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